Sugar free sweetner

Now your recipes can be So Sweet and still leave you without health issues

What is So Sweet?

 

Low on calorie, high on life

Welcome to the world, which is so sweet!
You must have spent sleepless nights thinking of newer ways of cutting down extra sugar. Out of shape dreams have given you many a nightmare. Diabetes in the family has made you feel the pain of resisting a succulent mango cheesecake or an oh so mouth-watering gulab jamun in many a house party. Tired of tasteless, non sugar chemical pills in your restless coffee, you have decided to say a  “no” to  the world of sweetness. It is a bitter place to live. Do not despair. So Sweet is here.

 

So Sweet is made from the pure extract of Stevia leaves. The ONLY natural alternative to sugar, it contains zero calories. Great for diabetics and weight watchers, it is indeed the sweetener of the future. Bereft of any side effects, it is suitable for all ages.

Stevia is widely used in Japan, China, USA, Australia, NZ, Russia and many other countries. Over 150 studies have been done on Stevia (more than sugar) in some of the most prestigious universities in the world confirming it is safe for human consumption.

for more details -http://www.sosweet.in/Product-Brief-10-2.html

Nutrition Facts

Serving size 1 g (100 g)      
Per 100gm Per 1gm
Protein 0gm 0gm
Fat 0gm 0gm
Carbohydrates 0gm 0gm
Energy

no carb 100% herbal stevia plant

Biotechnological_production_of_natural_zero-calorie_sweeteners-1024x683Stevia as a herb has a long history to present. It is one such untapped nature’s wonder which has the potential to alter the sugar dynamics of the world. However due to negligence, power equations, pulls & pressures, it has never been duly highlighted as a mass consumerist product despite it’s tried and tested good effects for mankind. So Sweet, pioneer of Indian Stevia makes an attempt to piece together a history of Stevia in all its glory.

Stevia: The Herb

Stevia is a genus of about 240 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. The species Stevia rebaudiana, commonly known as sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, or simply Stevia, is widely grown for its sweet leaves. As a sweetener and sugar substitute, stevia’s taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar.

Stevia vis-à-vis Sugar

With its extracts having up to 300 times the sweetness of sugar, stevia has garnered attention with the rise in demand for low-carbohydrate, low-sugar food alternatives.

Earliest Use

For centuries, the Guaraní tribes of Paraguay and Brazil used stevia, which they called ka’a he’ê (“sweet herb”), as a sweetener in yerba mate and medicinal teas for treating heartburn and other ailments.

Discovery

In 1899, The Swiss botanist Moisés Santiago Bertoni first described the plant and the sweet taste in detail. But only limited research was conducted on the topic, until in 1931, two French chemists isolated the glycosides, namely ‘Stevioside’ and ‘Rebaudioside’ that give Stevia its sweet taste.

Prominence

During WW II, sugar shortages prompted England to begin investigation of stevia for use as a sweetener. Cultivation began under the direction of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, but the project was abandoned in the aftermath of the war. Japan began cultivating stevia in hothouses in the 1950’s. By the 1970’s, Japan started using stevia commercially and today, they are the biggest users of the extract, which has captured 50% of Japan’s sweetener industry

zero calorie ,no carb 100% natural

Featured

Stevia as a herb has a long history to present. It is one such untapped nature’s wonder which has the potential to alter the sugar dynamics of the world. However due to negligence, power equations, pulls & pressures, it has never been duly highlighted as a mass consumerist product despite it’s tried and tested good effects for mankind. So Sweet, pioneer of Indian Stevia makes an attempt to piece together a history of Stevia in all its glory.

Stevia: The Herb

Stevia is a genus of about 240 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. The species Stevia rebaudiana, commonly known as sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, or simply Stevia, is widely grown for its sweet leaves. As a sweetener and sugar substitute, stevia’s taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar.

Stevia vis-à-vis Sugar

With its extracts having up to 300 times the sweetness of sugar, stevia has garnered attention with the rise in demand for low-carbohydrate, low-sugar food alternatives.

Earliest Use

For centuries, the Guaraní tribes of Paraguay and Brazil used stevia, which they called ka’a he’ê (“sweet herb”), as a sweetener in yerba mate and medicinal teas for treating heartburn and other ailments.

Discovery

In 1899, The Swiss botanist Moisés Santiago Bertoni first described the plant and the sweet taste in detail. But only limited research was conducted on the topic, until in 1931, two French chemists isolated the glycosides, namely ‘Stevioside’ and ‘Rebaudioside’ that give Stevia its sweet taste.

Prominence

During WW II, sugar shortages prompted England to begin investigation of stevia for use as a sweetener. Cultivation began under the direction of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, but the project was abandoned in the aftermath of the war. Japan began cultivating stevia in hothouses in the 1950’s. By the 1970’s, Japan started using stevia commercially and today, they are the biggest users of the extract, which has captured 50% of Japan’s sweetener industry